How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Singapore

Save precious water. Floss your teeth. Buckle up for safety. Those are just some of the truisms familiar to generations of Singaporeans. Since gaining independence five decades ago, the Southeast Asian city-state has seen countless government campaigns aimed to mold citizens who could live up to the nation’s leap from Third World to First. Design has played a central role in these efforts, as evident in the 6,000+ posters preserved in the National Archives of Singapore.

Since its establishment in 1968, this state institution has archived posters as part of its collection of material culture—including government records, maps, photographs, oral history interviews, audiovisual, and sound recordings—that are significant to Singapore’s history. Most of its posters come from government campaigns, with a small number created for cultural events, movies, and corporations.

Scrolling through the posters online via the National Archives website—the only way the public can access them—offers an illustrated history of Singapore’s development and the issues it’s faced. Campaigns came and went, but many were carried out annually for decades. Over the years, the poster collection has become a colorful historical resource referenced by television shows, books, and exhibitions to retell the development of national policies and the public service in Singapore. That the city has become a poster child for business and cleanliness, amongst other accolades today, is due, in no small part, to these posters.Eye on Design

Source: How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

“Don Quixote” Gets A Stunning Graphic Makeover

Don QuixoteDon QuixoteDon Quixote

Four hundred years after it was first published, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote is still commonly hailed as one of the finest novels ever written. Now the adventures of the feeble-brained hidalgo who think he’s a knight and his squat, trusty companion Sancho Panza have finally been collected into the mega-volume of graphic design porn they deserve.

Published by the always brilliant minds at Visual Editions, who previously gave the surreal hypertext of Tristram Shandy this jaw-dropping makeover, this latest version of Don Quixote uses design to explore the meta-fictional nature of the text.

Much of Don Quixote‘s effect lies in the juxtaposition of the way the chivalry-mad title character sees the world, and the way it actually is. The most famous example is Quixote fighting windmills he imagines to be giants. In the Visual Editions version, Quixote’s unique viewpoint of the world is separated from the rest of the text with sky blue fonts, footing the errant knight’s every word firmly in the clouds.

Source: Don Quixote Gets A Stunning Graphic Makeover

Little Black Font Book 2 becomes Amazon’s best-selling design book | Typography | Creative Bloq

Little Black Font Book

Little Black Font Book

Have a world of type at your fingertips with this pocket-sized source of inspiration. Little Black Font Book

Source: Typography | Creative Bloq

 

Within 24 hours of launching the Little Black Font Book 2, HypeForType’s slick type specimen book has taken number one slot in Amazon’s Typography in Graphic Arts section.

This volume is a “revised and improved” version of 2012’s book. Packed with vibrant layouts that bring each showcased font to life, the pocket-sized source of inspiration can be shown to clients – to help convince them of your design – or referenced yourself when creative block strikes.

The Collages of Guy Maddin – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin

Source: The Collages of Guy Maddin – From the Current – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin’s hypnotic and inventive cinematic worlds are complex assemblages of interwoven materials. So it comes as no surprise that Maddin is also a passionate collagist. In June, a collection of his collage work (presented along with collages by the poet John Ashbery) was even the subject of an exhibition at Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York. But for Maddin, the physical act of creating these pieces is also a private, therapeutic affair. “I suppose the playroom of this gluey and scissory medium is where I find refuge whenever cinema’s laws feel too literal-minded,” Maddin recently told us, “where I can secretly fashion the blueprints for the little visual collisions I hope will work on the big screen.” His surreal collages exist somewhere between sensual reveries and portraits of a nightmare, through which Maddin explores the themes of nostalgia and memory present in his work.

“I’ve been going increasingly public with the results,” Maddin told us, “because the collage parties my friends and I throw, which are nothing less than Jack Smith-style happenings, but with more taffeta, are simply getting to be too much fun not to share with the world.” And he added a bit of advice to the amateur collagist: “Don’t throw out your old porn magazines, they can be recycled in far tonier ways than any old paper shredder could dream up!”

Guy Maddin is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, MB Canada. www.LKAP.ca

19 Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

CriterionCriterionCriterionCriterionCriterion

In honor of Criterion’s 30th anniversary, Indiewire has singled out their most incredible cover designs.

Source: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

How do you capture the essence of a classic? Every day, the designers at the Criterion Collection are tasked with reimagining some of the most iconic creations in the history of cinema. Together with their team, Head Art Director Sarah Habibi and Designer/Art Director Eric Skillman analyze each film’s historical context, director’s career and influence on the popular imagination in order to conceptualize cover designs (their new book, “Criterion Designs,” details the process.) In repackaging dated or overlooked gems, the Criterion Collection lifts films out of the folds of history and gives them new life. But above all, Criterion’s work celebrates the visual language of cinema — and its indelible impact on human culture.

By Emily Buder | Indiewire November 4, 2015 at 4:19PM

The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro

From the books and movies that inspired Guillermo del Toro, to his must travel guide (with all the spooky intel), here is what GDT is feeling.

Guillermo del Toro

Source: The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro, as Told by GdT’s Twitter

Right now, Guillermo del Toro is everywhere. The group art show dedicated to his work may have recently ended, but with the October 16 premiere of his latest movie Crimson Peak, del Toro has kept busy with a press tour. Today, Bergdorf Goodman also unveiled the Fifth Avenue window they dedicated to the new gothic romance.

All this extra attention on del Toro couldn’t be better timed. We’ve decided to declare October the month of del Toro, Oct-Toro-ber if you will. After all, it’s pretty perfect that his birthday falls in the same month as Halloween, considering he’s the creator of some of the spookiest creatures in cinema.

In honor of his 51st, we are looking at the books, movies, and other influences that have impacted his life and art, according to his Twitter. Below are 13 things that have shaped del Toro.

Crimson Peak opens in theaters on October 16, 2015.

Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

20th C. Vintage circus posters

Send in the clowns, the acrobats — and Omikron, the living gasometer. by Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1923 “Arthur Klein-family.” The Circus Museum via Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1910 “Circus Corty-Althoff — The Banola Family. Known as the greatest gymnasts in the world. The flying family.”The Circus Museum via Europeana

The circus, as it we think of it today, originated in Britain in 1768 by inventor Philip Astley. Astley presented shows that included horse riding tricks, acrobats, music and clowns. None of these elements were new to the British public, but Astley was the first to combine them into a single show.

Astley did not call his “Amphitheatre of Equestrian Arts” a circus. That title was awarded to a later rival’s show in 1782, and became the generic term.

In 1793 Englishman John Bill Ricketts brought the circus to the U.S., opening in Philadelphia.

The traveling circus tent was invented by American Joshua Purdy Brown, replacing the usual wooden construction with a full canvas tent. His system became commonplace by the mid 1830s.

The unique character of the American circus emerged: a traveling tent-show coupled with a menagerie and run by businessmen. It was very different model from European circuses, which for the most part remained under the control of performing families.

Don’t worry: very few clowns.
Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

Forgetfulness

for·get·ful·ness

fərˈɡetfəlnəs/
noun
noun: forgetfulness

lapse of memory.
“she teased him for his forgetfulness”
synonyms: absentmindedness, amnesia, poor memory, a lapse of memory, vagueness, abstraction; More
informalscattiness
“his excuse was forgetfulness”
neglect, heedlessness, carelessness, disregard;
inattention, obliviousness, lack of concern, indifference
“a forgetfulness of duty”
antonyms: reliability, heed.

forgetfulness-victor-ruano-santasombra

Forgetfulness

The name of the author is the first to go
followed obediently by the title, the plot,
the heartbreaking conclusion, the entire novel
which suddenly becomes one you have never read, never even heard of,
as if, one by one, the memories you used to harbor
decided to retire to the southern hemisphere of the brain,
to a little fishing village where there are no phones.
Long ago you kissed the names of the nine muses goodbye
and watched the quadratic equation pack its bag,
and even now as you memorize the order of the planets,
something else is slipping away, a state flower perhaps,
the address of an uncle, the capital of Paraguay.
Whatever it is you are struggling to remember,
it is not poised on the tip of your tongue
or even lurking in some obscure corner of your spleen.
It has floated away down a dark mythological river
whose name begins with an L as far as you can recall
well on your own way to oblivion where you will join those
who have even forgotten how to swim and how to ride a bicycle.
No wonder you rise in the middle of the night
to look up the date of a famous battle in a book on war.
No wonder the moon in the window seems to have drifted
out of a love poem that you used to know by heart.

Poem by Billy Collins
Illustration by: Victor Ruano / Santasombra