How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Singapore

Save precious water. Floss your teeth. Buckle up for safety. Those are just some of the truisms familiar to generations of Singaporeans. Since gaining independence five decades ago, the Southeast Asian city-state has seen countless government campaigns aimed to mold citizens who could live up to the nation’s leap from Third World to First. Design has played a central role in these efforts, as evident in the 6,000+ posters preserved in the National Archives of Singapore.

Since its establishment in 1968, this state institution has archived posters as part of its collection of material culture—including government records, maps, photographs, oral history interviews, audiovisual, and sound recordings—that are significant to Singapore’s history. Most of its posters come from government campaigns, with a small number created for cultural events, movies, and corporations.

Scrolling through the posters online via the National Archives website—the only way the public can access them—offers an illustrated history of Singapore’s development and the issues it’s faced. Campaigns came and went, but many were carried out annually for decades. Over the years, the poster collection has become a colorful historical resource referenced by television shows, books, and exhibitions to retell the development of national policies and the public service in Singapore. That the city has become a poster child for business and cleanliness, amongst other accolades today, is due, in no small part, to these posters.Eye on Design

Source: How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Pentagram: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

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“Everything we do is about storytelling,” Stout says.

Source Pentagram’s DJ Stout: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

The cover of Texas Monthly‘s July 1992 issue features an portrait of then governor Ann Richards sitting on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. She’s dressed head to toe white leather, her hair is coiffed in her signature gray bouffant, and she stares confidently at the camera. To DJ Stout, the cover’s designer, this portrait of Richards, 60 years old at the time, was “the perfect metaphor for capturing her salty wit and irreverent personality,” he once wrote. In a fleeting glance, readers knew it wasn’t business as usual at the Texas statehouse. The audacious concept is also one of the perfect examples of Stout’s evocative, eclectic approach to visual design.

19 Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

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In honor of Criterion’s 30th anniversary, Indiewire has singled out their most incredible cover designs.

Source: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

How do you capture the essence of a classic? Every day, the designers at the Criterion Collection are tasked with reimagining some of the most iconic creations in the history of cinema. Together with their team, Head Art Director Sarah Habibi and Designer/Art Director Eric Skillman analyze each film’s historical context, director’s career and influence on the popular imagination in order to conceptualize cover designs (their new book, “Criterion Designs,” details the process.) In repackaging dated or overlooked gems, the Criterion Collection lifts films out of the folds of history and gives them new life. But above all, Criterion’s work celebrates the visual language of cinema — and its indelible impact on human culture.

By Emily Buder | Indiewire November 4, 2015 at 4:19PM

From SiegelGale: 4 Lessons On Great Logo Design

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SiegelGale Brian Rafferty explains why the best logos are the simplest ones, and why new logo backlash is something every brand should expect.
Source: 4 Lessons On Great Logo Design From Siegel+Gale | Co.Design | business + design

What makes a logo successful? Ask a dozen different designers, and you’ll get a dozen different answers. But how do you quantify a logo’s excellence, or lack thereof? If you’re Siegel+Gale, you organize a study of 3,000 respondents in the U.S. and U.K. to try to put some actual stats on the problem.

We spoke with Siegel+Gale’s global director of research insights, Brian Rafferty, to find out what makes logos memorable, and why logo backlash is often not as big a deal as it first appears.