3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design OFFF Eye on Design

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Source: 3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design Curve From the Founder of Barcelona’s Creative Conference OFFF Eye on Design | Eye on Design

The founder and director of Barcelona’s OFFF festival, Hector Ayuso, first dreamt up the idea of a conference dedicated to exploring the world of online and offline design on a lazy Sunday afternoon in 2000. He was playing around with Flash on his computer, completely fascinated by the program’s possibilities when he realized he wanted to create a space where people could share their work and talk about how new platforms and programs like Flash were shaping and changing the industry.

That was over 15 years ago. Since then, OFFF has put numerous high-profile speakers onstage, including Paula Scher, Rick Poynor, Erik Spiekermann, and Rob Chiu. After hearing from such an eclectic range of minds over the years, Ayuso finds it easy to chart the industries’ changes and soak up words of wisdom.

Pentagram: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

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“Everything we do is about storytelling,” Stout says.

Source Pentagram’s DJ Stout: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

The cover of Texas Monthly‘s July 1992 issue features an portrait of then governor Ann Richards sitting on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. She’s dressed head to toe white leather, her hair is coiffed in her signature gray bouffant, and she stares confidently at the camera. To DJ Stout, the cover’s designer, this portrait of Richards, 60 years old at the time, was “the perfect metaphor for capturing her salty wit and irreverent personality,” he once wrote. In a fleeting glance, readers knew it wasn’t business as usual at the Texas statehouse. The audacious concept is also one of the perfect examples of Stout’s evocative, eclectic approach to visual design.

Little Black Font Book 2 becomes Amazon’s best-selling design book | Typography | Creative Bloq

Little Black Font Book

Little Black Font Book

Have a world of type at your fingertips with this pocket-sized source of inspiration. Little Black Font Book

Source: Typography | Creative Bloq

 

Within 24 hours of launching the Little Black Font Book 2, HypeForType’s slick type specimen book has taken number one slot in Amazon’s Typography in Graphic Arts section.

This volume is a “revised and improved” version of 2012’s book. Packed with vibrant layouts that bring each showcased font to life, the pocket-sized source of inspiration can be shown to clients – to help convince them of your design – or referenced yourself when creative block strikes.

19 Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

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In honor of Criterion’s 30th anniversary, Indiewire has singled out their most incredible cover designs.

Source: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

How do you capture the essence of a classic? Every day, the designers at the Criterion Collection are tasked with reimagining some of the most iconic creations in the history of cinema. Together with their team, Head Art Director Sarah Habibi and Designer/Art Director Eric Skillman analyze each film’s historical context, director’s career and influence on the popular imagination in order to conceptualize cover designs (their new book, “Criterion Designs,” details the process.) In repackaging dated or overlooked gems, the Criterion Collection lifts films out of the folds of history and gives them new life. But above all, Criterion’s work celebrates the visual language of cinema — and its indelible impact on human culture.

By Emily Buder | Indiewire November 4, 2015 at 4:19PM

Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

20th C. Vintage circus posters

Send in the clowns, the acrobats — and Omikron, the living gasometer. by Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1923 “Arthur Klein-family.” The Circus Museum via Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1910 “Circus Corty-Althoff — The Banola Family. Known as the greatest gymnasts in the world. The flying family.”The Circus Museum via Europeana

The circus, as it we think of it today, originated in Britain in 1768 by inventor Philip Astley. Astley presented shows that included horse riding tricks, acrobats, music and clowns. None of these elements were new to the British public, but Astley was the first to combine them into a single show.

Astley did not call his “Amphitheatre of Equestrian Arts” a circus. That title was awarded to a later rival’s show in 1782, and became the generic term.

In 1793 Englishman John Bill Ricketts brought the circus to the U.S., opening in Philadelphia.

The traveling circus tent was invented by American Joshua Purdy Brown, replacing the usual wooden construction with a full canvas tent. His system became commonplace by the mid 1830s.

The unique character of the American circus emerged: a traveling tent-show coupled with a menagerie and run by businessmen. It was very different model from European circuses, which for the most part remained under the control of performing families.

Don’t worry: very few clowns.
Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice