El Puma de Quelepa Screening at AFI LAFF

El Puma de Quelepa AFI Laff Santasombra Victor RuanoI would like to invite you to the screening of El Puma de Quelepa at the 2017 AFI Latin American Film Festival, as part of its selection of the best filmmaking from Latinoamérica. The first screening is this coming October 3rd at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in DC metro area. Hope to see you there! More information here: https://silver.afi.com/Browsing/EventsAndExperiences/EventDetails/0000000008

How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Singapore

Save precious water. Floss your teeth. Buckle up for safety. Those are just some of the truisms familiar to generations of Singaporeans. Since gaining independence five decades ago, the Southeast Asian city-state has seen countless government campaigns aimed to mold citizens who could live up to the nation’s leap from Third World to First. Design has played a central role in these efforts, as evident in the 6,000+ posters preserved in the National Archives of Singapore.

Since its establishment in 1968, this state institution has archived posters as part of its collection of material culture—including government records, maps, photographs, oral history interviews, audiovisual, and sound recordings—that are significant to Singapore’s history. Most of its posters come from government campaigns, with a small number created for cultural events, movies, and corporations.

Scrolling through the posters online via the National Archives website—the only way the public can access them—offers an illustrated history of Singapore’s development and the issues it’s faced. Campaigns came and went, but many were carried out annually for decades. Over the years, the poster collection has become a colorful historical resource referenced by television shows, books, and exhibitions to retell the development of national policies and the public service in Singapore. That the city has become a poster child for business and cleanliness, amongst other accolades today, is due, in no small part, to these posters.Eye on Design

Source: How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

20th C. Vintage circus posters

Send in the clowns, the acrobats — and Omikron, the living gasometer. by Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1923 “Arthur Klein-family.” The Circus Museum via Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1910 “Circus Corty-Althoff — The Banola Family. Known as the greatest gymnasts in the world. The flying family.”The Circus Museum via Europeana

The circus, as it we think of it today, originated in Britain in 1768 by inventor Philip Astley. Astley presented shows that included horse riding tricks, acrobats, music and clowns. None of these elements were new to the British public, but Astley was the first to combine them into a single show.

Astley did not call his “Amphitheatre of Equestrian Arts” a circus. That title was awarded to a later rival’s show in 1782, and became the generic term.

In 1793 Englishman John Bill Ricketts brought the circus to the U.S., opening in Philadelphia.

The traveling circus tent was invented by American Joshua Purdy Brown, replacing the usual wooden construction with a full canvas tent. His system became commonplace by the mid 1830s.

The unique character of the American circus emerged: a traveling tent-show coupled with a menagerie and run by businessmen. It was very different model from European circuses, which for the most part remained under the control of performing families.

Don’t worry: very few clowns.
Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice