El Puma de Quelepa Screening at AFI LAFF

El Puma de Quelepa AFI Laff Santasombra Victor RuanoI would like to invite you to the screening of El Puma de Quelepa at the 2017 AFI Latin American Film Festival, as part of its selection of the best filmmaking from Latinoamérica. The first screening is this coming October 3rd at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in DC metro area. Hope to see you there! More information here: https://silver.afi.com/Browsing/EventsAndExperiences/EventDetails/0000000008

My Collection of Certificates Through the Years

Certificates Collection

Diseño Une
diploma-disenoune-victor-ruano-santasombra certificates

Emmy Awards 2010
diploma-emmy-2010-victor-ruano-santasombra certificates

Emmy Awards 2013
diploma-emmy-2013-victor-ruano-santasombra

Escuela Mónica Herrera
diploma-monicaherrera-victor-ruano-santasombra

Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School
diploma-rogue-film-school-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-1-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-2-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-3-victor-ruano-santasombra

SED
diploma-UDJMD-sed-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Nacional de El Salvador
diploma-UES-victor-ruano-santasombra

UNICAES
diploma-unicaes-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-4-victor-ruano-santasombra

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The Collages of Guy Maddin – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin

Source: The Collages of Guy Maddin – From the Current – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin’s hypnotic and inventive cinematic worlds are complex assemblages of interwoven materials. So it comes as no surprise that Maddin is also a passionate collagist. In June, a collection of his collage work (presented along with collages by the poet John Ashbery) was even the subject of an exhibition at Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York. But for Maddin, the physical act of creating these pieces is also a private, therapeutic affair. “I suppose the playroom of this gluey and scissory medium is where I find refuge whenever cinema’s laws feel too literal-minded,” Maddin recently told us, “where I can secretly fashion the blueprints for the little visual collisions I hope will work on the big screen.” His surreal collages exist somewhere between sensual reveries and portraits of a nightmare, through which Maddin explores the themes of nostalgia and memory present in his work.

“I’ve been going increasingly public with the results,” Maddin told us, “because the collage parties my friends and I throw, which are nothing less than Jack Smith-style happenings, but with more taffeta, are simply getting to be too much fun not to share with the world.” And he added a bit of advice to the amateur collagist: “Don’t throw out your old porn magazines, they can be recycled in far tonier ways than any old paper shredder could dream up!”

Guy Maddin is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, MB Canada. www.LKAP.ca

19 Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

CriterionCriterionCriterionCriterionCriterion

In honor of Criterion’s 30th anniversary, Indiewire has singled out their most incredible cover designs.

Source: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

How do you capture the essence of a classic? Every day, the designers at the Criterion Collection are tasked with reimagining some of the most iconic creations in the history of cinema. Together with their team, Head Art Director Sarah Habibi and Designer/Art Director Eric Skillman analyze each film’s historical context, director’s career and influence on the popular imagination in order to conceptualize cover designs (their new book, “Criterion Designs,” details the process.) In repackaging dated or overlooked gems, the Criterion Collection lifts films out of the folds of history and gives them new life. But above all, Criterion’s work celebrates the visual language of cinema — and its indelible impact on human culture.

By Emily Buder | Indiewire November 4, 2015 at 4:19PM

The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro

From the books and movies that inspired Guillermo del Toro, to his must travel guide (with all the spooky intel), here is what GDT is feeling.

Guillermo del Toro

Source: The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro, as Told by GdT’s Twitter

Right now, Guillermo del Toro is everywhere. The group art show dedicated to his work may have recently ended, but with the October 16 premiere of his latest movie Crimson Peak, del Toro has kept busy with a press tour. Today, Bergdorf Goodman also unveiled the Fifth Avenue window they dedicated to the new gothic romance.

All this extra attention on del Toro couldn’t be better timed. We’ve decided to declare October the month of del Toro, Oct-Toro-ber if you will. After all, it’s pretty perfect that his birthday falls in the same month as Halloween, considering he’s the creator of some of the spookiest creatures in cinema.

In honor of his 51st, we are looking at the books, movies, and other influences that have impacted his life and art, according to his Twitter. Below are 13 things that have shaped del Toro.

Crimson Peak opens in theaters on October 16, 2015.

Chantal Akerman on Pierrot le fou – YouTube

Chantal Akerman describes the effect of seeing Jean-Luc Godard’s PIERROT LE FOU for the first time in this 2009 interview for the Criterion Collection.

Out now on DVD: http://www.criterion.com/films/302-je…

Comments:

– She describes perfectly the feeling of watching the film for the first time.
– I had precisely the same experience at the same age the first time i watched ‘pierrot le fou.’ it was the first film to make me see cinema as a form of art and not simply a medium of entertainment.
– Heh. I felt the same watching Jeanne Dielman! And, of course, also felt that way after watching Pierrot le fou.

Chantal Akerman

DJI Osmo Is a Powerful 4K Camera with an Integrated 3-Axis Gimbal Stabilizer

DJI Osmos

DJI’s drone cameras have come back down to earth, and have been transformed into a unique and powerful tool for stabilized handheld video. The Chinese company today announced Osmo, a new twist on the action camera that has tremendous potential not only for consumer-level videography, but for filmmakers as well. Sporting a simple pistol grip and one of DJI’s Zenmuse 3-axis gimbal stabilizers, the Osmo brings highly-stabilized 4K video and 120fps HD video right to your hands. The device also offers hyperlapse and timelapse functionality, as well as panoramic shooting.

First up, here are the two introductory videos for the DJI Osmo.

The Osmo appears to be using the same 4K camera — or at least one that is very similar — to the camera that is included with the Phantom 3 Professional. The main difference between the two is that the camera on the Osmo is capable of 120fps in full HD, whereas the Phantom 3 Professional camera tops out at 60fps.

Like the rest of DJI’s cameras, the Osmo needs to be used with a smartphone in order to monitor your footage and change most of the internal settings on the camera. With that said, the pistol grip has some basic functionality built into it, like a record button, joystick for controlling the gimbal manually, and a toggle switch to change the mode in which the gimbal is operating.

Source: DJI Osmo Is a Powerful 4K Camera with an Integrated 3-Axis Gimbal Stabilizer

Chantal Akerman, Pioneer of Feminist and Structuralist Fi | Criticwire

Chantal Akerman is one of my top favorite filmmakers… I will miss her work.

Chantal Akerman

Tributes to the pioneering director of “Jeanne Dielman” and “No Home Movie”

Source: Chantal Akerman, Pioneer of Feminist and Structuralist Fi | Criticwire

Chantal Akerman, whose movies revolutionized both feminist and structuralist cinema, has died at the age of 65. Her death leaves a gap as incalculable as her impact on the history of cinema; that she died, according to Le Monde, by her own hand is almost unfathomable. News of her death reaches the U.S. just a day before “No Home Movie’s” first screenings at the New York Film Festival…

Film Snob? Is That So Wrong? – The New York Times

Film Snob

A. O. Scott offers a challenge to the Yelp era, when everyone is a critic.

Source: Film Snob? Is That So Wrong? – The New York Times

Is snobbery dead?

Before exploring the possible answers — Mais non! Good riddance! Who cares? — we should perhaps define our terms. The word “snob” has a contested etymology and an interestingly tangled set of uses. According to the Oxford English Dictionary (no second-rate sources here; what do you take me for?), it originated in the 18th century as a term for a shoemaker. For much of the 19th century, it was used to refer to persons of “no breeding.” According to the Oxford website, “in time the word came to describe someone with an exaggerated respect for high social position or wealth who looks down on those regarded as socially inferior.” A pretender. A poser. A wannabe. An arriviste.