Glitched self-portraits

This post is a personal collection of my most recent glitched self-portraits that I have uploaded at my profile in ELLO. I have been using only my cell-phone and several apps for Android to achieve these results. Tools used for this project: Processing, Pixel sorting, Data bending, Data moshing, Scanner, Chromatic, 3D, VHS, Warp, Ghost, Burn, Quake, Window, XDR, Drone, Pixel, Triangle, Delaunay, Wave, Hacker, WEBP, Rubik, Artisanal.

Glitched self-portraits:

glitched victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-001

glitched victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-002

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-003

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-004

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-005

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-006

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-007

glitched-self-portraits-victor-ruano-santasombra-000

My Collection of Certificates Through the Years

Certificates Collection

Diseño Une
diploma-disenoune-victor-ruano-santasombra certificates

Emmy Awards 2010
diploma-emmy-2010-victor-ruano-santasombra certificates

Emmy Awards 2013
diploma-emmy-2013-victor-ruano-santasombra

Escuela Mónica Herrera
diploma-monicaherrera-victor-ruano-santasombra

Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School
diploma-rogue-film-school-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-1-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-2-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-3-victor-ruano-santasombra

SED
diploma-UDJMD-sed-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Nacional de El Salvador
diploma-UES-victor-ruano-santasombra

UNICAES
diploma-unicaes-victor-ruano-santasombra

Universidad Dr. José Matías Delgado
diploma-UDJMD-4-victor-ruano-santasombra

The Collages of Guy Maddin – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin

Source: The Collages of Guy Maddin – From the Current – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin’s hypnotic and inventive cinematic worlds are complex assemblages of interwoven materials. So it comes as no surprise that Maddin is also a passionate collagist. In June, a collection of his collage work (presented along with collages by the poet John Ashbery) was even the subject of an exhibition at Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York. But for Maddin, the physical act of creating these pieces is also a private, therapeutic affair. “I suppose the playroom of this gluey and scissory medium is where I find refuge whenever cinema’s laws feel too literal-minded,” Maddin recently told us, “where I can secretly fashion the blueprints for the little visual collisions I hope will work on the big screen.” His surreal collages exist somewhere between sensual reveries and portraits of a nightmare, through which Maddin explores the themes of nostalgia and memory present in his work.

“I’ve been going increasingly public with the results,” Maddin told us, “because the collage parties my friends and I throw, which are nothing less than Jack Smith-style happenings, but with more taffeta, are simply getting to be too much fun not to share with the world.” And he added a bit of advice to the amateur collagist: “Don’t throw out your old porn magazines, they can be recycled in far tonier ways than any old paper shredder could dream up!”

Guy Maddin is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, MB Canada. www.LKAP.ca

The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro

From the books and movies that inspired Guillermo del Toro, to his must travel guide (with all the spooky intel), here is what GDT is feeling.

Guillermo del Toro

Source: The 13 Works of Art That Shaped Guillermo del Toro, as Told by GdT’s Twitter

Right now, Guillermo del Toro is everywhere. The group art show dedicated to his work may have recently ended, but with the October 16 premiere of his latest movie Crimson Peak, del Toro has kept busy with a press tour. Today, Bergdorf Goodman also unveiled the Fifth Avenue window they dedicated to the new gothic romance.

All this extra attention on del Toro couldn’t be better timed. We’ve decided to declare October the month of del Toro, Oct-Toro-ber if you will. After all, it’s pretty perfect that his birthday falls in the same month as Halloween, considering he’s the creator of some of the spookiest creatures in cinema.

In honor of his 51st, we are looking at the books, movies, and other influences that have impacted his life and art, according to his Twitter. Below are 13 things that have shaped del Toro.

Crimson Peak opens in theaters on October 16, 2015.

Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

20th C. Vintage circus posters

Send in the clowns, the acrobats — and Omikron, the living gasometer. by Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1923 “Arthur Klein-family.” The Circus Museum via Europeana

Vintage circus posters
1910 “Circus Corty-Althoff — The Banola Family. Known as the greatest gymnasts in the world. The flying family.”The Circus Museum via Europeana

The circus, as it we think of it today, originated in Britain in 1768 by inventor Philip Astley. Astley presented shows that included horse riding tricks, acrobats, music and clowns. None of these elements were new to the British public, but Astley was the first to combine them into a single show.

Astley did not call his “Amphitheatre of Equestrian Arts” a circus. That title was awarded to a later rival’s show in 1782, and became the generic term.

In 1793 Englishman John Bill Ricketts brought the circus to the U.S., opening in Philadelphia.

The traveling circus tent was invented by American Joshua Purdy Brown, replacing the usual wooden construction with a full canvas tent. His system became commonplace by the mid 1830s.

The unique character of the American circus emerged: a traveling tent-show coupled with a menagerie and run by businessmen. It was very different model from European circuses, which for the most part remained under the control of performing families.

Don’t worry: very few clowns.
Vintage circus posters picture kangaroos and women trapped in ice

Chantal Akerman on Pierrot le fou – YouTube

Chantal Akerman describes the effect of seeing Jean-Luc Godard’s PIERROT LE FOU for the first time in this 2009 interview for the Criterion Collection.

Out now on DVD: http://www.criterion.com/films/302-je…

Comments:

– She describes perfectly the feeling of watching the film for the first time.
– I had precisely the same experience at the same age the first time i watched ‘pierrot le fou.’ it was the first film to make me see cinema as a form of art and not simply a medium of entertainment.
– Heh. I felt the same watching Jeanne Dielman! And, of course, also felt that way after watching Pierrot le fou.

Chantal Akerman