Glitched self-portraits

This post is a personal collection of my most recent glitched self-portraits that I have uploaded at my profile in ELLO. I have been using only my cell-phone and several apps for Android to achieve these results. Tools used for this project: Processing, Pixel sorting, Data bending, Data moshing, Scanner, Chromatic, 3D, VHS, Warp, Ghost, Burn, Quake, Window, XDR, Drone, Pixel, Triangle, Delaunay, Wave, Hacker, WEBP, Rubik, Artisanal.

Glitched self-portraits:

glitched victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-001

glitched victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-002

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-003

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-004

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-005

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-006

victor-ruano-portrait-santasombra-glitch-007

glitched-self-portraits-victor-ruano-santasombra-000

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The Collages of Guy Maddin – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin

Source: The Collages of Guy Maddin – From the Current – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin’s hypnotic and inventive cinematic worlds are complex assemblages of interwoven materials. So it comes as no surprise that Maddin is also a passionate collagist. In June, a collection of his collage work (presented along with collages by the poet John Ashbery) was even the subject of an exhibition at Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York. But for Maddin, the physical act of creating these pieces is also a private, therapeutic affair. “I suppose the playroom of this gluey and scissory medium is where I find refuge whenever cinema’s laws feel too literal-minded,” Maddin recently told us, “where I can secretly fashion the blueprints for the little visual collisions I hope will work on the big screen.” His surreal collages exist somewhere between sensual reveries and portraits of a nightmare, through which Maddin explores the themes of nostalgia and memory present in his work.

“I’ve been going increasingly public with the results,” Maddin told us, “because the collage parties my friends and I throw, which are nothing less than Jack Smith-style happenings, but with more taffeta, are simply getting to be too much fun not to share with the world.” And he added a bit of advice to the amateur collagist: “Don’t throw out your old porn magazines, they can be recycled in far tonier ways than any old paper shredder could dream up!”

Guy Maddin is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, MB Canada. www.LKAP.ca

19 Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

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In honor of Criterion’s 30th anniversary, Indiewire has singled out their most incredible cover designs.

Source: The 19 Most Stunning Movie Covers By the Criterion Collection

How do you capture the essence of a classic? Every day, the designers at the Criterion Collection are tasked with reimagining some of the most iconic creations in the history of cinema. Together with their team, Head Art Director Sarah Habibi and Designer/Art Director Eric Skillman analyze each film’s historical context, director’s career and influence on the popular imagination in order to conceptualize cover designs (their new book, “Criterion Designs,” details the process.) In repackaging dated or overlooked gems, the Criterion Collection lifts films out of the folds of history and gives them new life. But above all, Criterion’s work celebrates the visual language of cinema — and its indelible impact on human culture.

By Emily Buder | Indiewire November 4, 2015 at 4:19PM

Arabic Typefaces, Why It’s So Hard to Design them?

Arabic Typefaces, Why It’s So Hard to Design them?

Arabic Typefaces

New type foundry TPTQ Arabic is dedicated to developing expressive, but authentic, Arabic typefaces.

Typeface design has a western-normativity problem: for years, most Arabic typefaces have been designed by Latin-language typographers. But Arabic is built differently than Latin—its letters can have different contextual shapes, they always connect, and they eschew upper and lowercase letters—which means applying western ideas about type design is asking the script to conform to an unnatural set of standards.

“In the last 60 years Arabic has gone through many changes, and not really positive ones,”says Peter Bil’ak, founder of Dutch type foundry Typotheque. “It’s been subjected to western printing techniques, which cannot accommodate the number of glyphs [in Arabic].” The resulting product is “Simplified Arabic,” a legible but anemic version of the calligraphic script that Bil’ak calls “obviously not great.”

Source: Why It’s So Hard to Design Arabic Typefaces