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3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design OFFF Eye on Design

OFFFOFFF

Source: 3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design Curve From the Founder of Barcelona’s Creative Conference OFFF Eye on Design | Eye on Design

The founder and director of Barcelona’s OFFF festival, Hector Ayuso, first dreamt up the idea of a conference dedicated to exploring the world of online and offline design on a lazy Sunday afternoon in 2000. He was playing around with Flash on his computer, completely fascinated by the program’s possibilities when he realized he wanted to create a space where people could share their work and talk about how new platforms and programs like Flash were shaping and changing the industry.

That was over 15 years ago. Since then, OFFF has put numerous high-profile speakers onstage, including Paula Scher, Rick Poynor, Erik Spiekermann, and Rob Chiu. After hearing from such an eclectic range of minds over the years, Ayuso finds it easy to chart the industries’ changes and soak up words of wisdom.

How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Singapore

Save precious water. Floss your teeth. Buckle up for safety. Those are just some of the truisms familiar to generations of Singaporeans. Since gaining independence five decades ago, the Southeast Asian city-state has seen countless government campaigns aimed to mold citizens who could live up to the nation’s leap from Third World to First. Design has played a central role in these efforts, as evident in the 6,000+ posters preserved in the National Archives of Singapore.

Since its establishment in 1968, this state institution has archived posters as part of its collection of material culture—including government records, maps, photographs, oral history interviews, audiovisual, and sound recordings—that are significant to Singapore’s history. Most of its posters come from government campaigns, with a small number created for cultural events, movies, and corporations.

Scrolling through the posters online via the National Archives website—the only way the public can access them—offers an illustrated history of Singapore’s development and the issues it’s faced. Campaigns came and went, but many were carried out annually for decades. Over the years, the poster collection has become a colorful historical resource referenced by television shows, books, and exhibitions to retell the development of national policies and the public service in Singapore. That the city has become a poster child for business and cleanliness, amongst other accolades today, is due, in no small part, to these posters.Eye on Design

Source: How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design