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3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design OFFF Eye on Design

OFFFOFFF

Source: 3 Ways to Stay Ahead of the Design Curve From the Founder of Barcelona’s Creative Conference OFFF Eye on Design | Eye on Design

The founder and director of Barcelona’s OFFF festival, Hector Ayuso, first dreamt up the idea of a conference dedicated to exploring the world of online and offline design on a lazy Sunday afternoon in 2000. He was playing around with Flash on his computer, completely fascinated by the program’s possibilities when he realized he wanted to create a space where people could share their work and talk about how new platforms and programs like Flash were shaping and changing the industry.

That was over 15 years ago. Since then, OFFF has put numerous high-profile speakers onstage, including Paula Scher, Rick Poynor, Erik Spiekermann, and Rob Chiu. After hearing from such an eclectic range of minds over the years, Ayuso finds it easy to chart the industries’ changes and soak up words of wisdom.

How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

Singapore

Save precious water. Floss your teeth. Buckle up for safety. Those are just some of the truisms familiar to generations of Singaporeans. Since gaining independence five decades ago, the Southeast Asian city-state has seen countless government campaigns aimed to mold citizens who could live up to the nation’s leap from Third World to First. Design has played a central role in these efforts, as evident in the 6,000+ posters preserved in the National Archives of Singapore.

Since its establishment in 1968, this state institution has archived posters as part of its collection of material culture—including government records, maps, photographs, oral history interviews, audiovisual, and sound recordings—that are significant to Singapore’s history. Most of its posters come from government campaigns, with a small number created for cultural events, movies, and corporations.

Scrolling through the posters online via the National Archives website—the only way the public can access them—offers an illustrated history of Singapore’s development and the issues it’s faced. Campaigns came and went, but many were carried out annually for decades. Over the years, the poster collection has become a colorful historical resource referenced by television shows, books, and exhibitions to retell the development of national policies and the public service in Singapore. That the city has become a poster child for business and cleanliness, amongst other accolades today, is due, in no small part, to these posters.Eye on Design

Source: How Singapore Became a Poster Child | Eye on Design

“Don Quixote” Gets A Stunning Graphic Makeover

Don QuixoteDon QuixoteDon Quixote

Four hundred years after it was first published, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote is still commonly hailed as one of the finest novels ever written. Now the adventures of the feeble-brained hidalgo who think he’s a knight and his squat, trusty companion Sancho Panza have finally been collected into the mega-volume of graphic design porn they deserve.

Published by the always brilliant minds at Visual Editions, who previously gave the surreal hypertext of Tristram Shandy this jaw-dropping makeover, this latest version of Don Quixote uses design to explore the meta-fictional nature of the text.

Much of Don Quixote‘s effect lies in the juxtaposition of the way the chivalry-mad title character sees the world, and the way it actually is. The most famous example is Quixote fighting windmills he imagines to be giants. In the Visual Editions version, Quixote’s unique viewpoint of the world is separated from the rest of the text with sky blue fonts, footing the errant knight’s every word firmly in the clouds.

Source: Don Quixote Gets A Stunning Graphic Makeover

Pentagram: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

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“Everything we do is about storytelling,” Stout says.

Source Pentagram’s DJ Stout: There Needs To Be More Storytelling In Graphic Design

The cover of Texas Monthly‘s July 1992 issue features an portrait of then governor Ann Richards sitting on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. She’s dressed head to toe white leather, her hair is coiffed in her signature gray bouffant, and she stares confidently at the camera. To DJ Stout, the cover’s designer, this portrait of Richards, 60 years old at the time, was “the perfect metaphor for capturing her salty wit and irreverent personality,” he once wrote. In a fleeting glance, readers knew it wasn’t business as usual at the Texas statehouse. The audacious concept is also one of the perfect examples of Stout’s evocative, eclectic approach to visual design.

Little Black Font Book 2 becomes Amazon’s best-selling design book | Typography | Creative Bloq

Little Black Font Book

Little Black Font Book

Have a world of type at your fingertips with this pocket-sized source of inspiration. Little Black Font Book

Source: Typography | Creative Bloq

 

Within 24 hours of launching the Little Black Font Book 2, HypeForType’s slick type specimen book has taken number one slot in Amazon’s Typography in Graphic Arts section.

This volume is a “revised and improved” version of 2012’s book. Packed with vibrant layouts that bring each showcased font to life, the pocket-sized source of inspiration can be shown to clients – to help convince them of your design – or referenced yourself when creative block strikes.

The Collages of Guy Maddin – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin

Source: The Collages of Guy Maddin – From the Current – The Criterion Collection

Guy Maddin’s hypnotic and inventive cinematic worlds are complex assemblages of interwoven materials. So it comes as no surprise that Maddin is also a passionate collagist. In June, a collection of his collage work (presented along with collages by the poet John Ashbery) was even the subject of an exhibition at Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York. But for Maddin, the physical act of creating these pieces is also a private, therapeutic affair. “I suppose the playroom of this gluey and scissory medium is where I find refuge whenever cinema’s laws feel too literal-minded,” Maddin recently told us, “where I can secretly fashion the blueprints for the little visual collisions I hope will work on the big screen.” His surreal collages exist somewhere between sensual reveries and portraits of a nightmare, through which Maddin explores the themes of nostalgia and memory present in his work.

“I’ve been going increasingly public with the results,” Maddin told us, “because the collage parties my friends and I throw, which are nothing less than Jack Smith-style happenings, but with more taffeta, are simply getting to be too much fun not to share with the world.” And he added a bit of advice to the amateur collagist: “Don’t throw out your old porn magazines, they can be recycled in far tonier ways than any old paper shredder could dream up!”

Guy Maddin is represented by Lisa Kehler Art + Projects in Winnipeg, MB Canada. www.LKAP.ca